Partnering to Create Better Health for Moms and Babies in Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi and Tanzania

A nurse in Malawi tends to a patient

Canada-Africa Initiative to Address Maternal, Newborn and Child Mortality

Project Timeline: March 2016 to March 2020

Funders: Government of Canada through Global Affairs Canada
Ethiopiaid Canada

Situation: Rural and remote areas lack access to basic health care essential for mother and child survival

Significant progress has been made around the world in reducing the number of women who die in pregnancy or childbirth – the rate dropped globally by 43% between 2000 and 2015. Yet, in many communities in sub-Saharan Africa, the maternal and newborn mortality rates continue to be unacceptably high.

  • 550 women in sub-Saharan Africa continue to die every day from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth (compared to 5 in developed countries).
  • 985,000 newborns in Africa died in 2015 alone.

Mothers and newborns in remote, rural and fragile communities are at greatest risk because they lack access to basic, life-saving health care and everyday infrastructure, such as clean water and sanitation, so important for healthy living.

Action: Working in partnership to reduce mother and newborn deaths in rural or remote areas

We are bringing together Canadian and African expertise to tackle key contributors to poor health, including:

  • poor access to family planning and other sexual and reproductive health services; 
  • lack of clean water;
  • inadequate sanitation;
  • shortage of trained health workers;
  • gaps in information for parents about basic child health;
  • malnutrition and under nutrition;
  • overcrowded and poorly equipped health facilities;
  • lack of systems to track vital health data; and,
  • gender inequality

Partners

Christian Children’s Fund of Canada

Centre for Global Child Health at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto 

WaterAid Canada

Year One Highlights

Planning: Over the course of several months, partners in Canada and Africa worked together to map out how the individual activities will be carried out within the required budget and timeframe, while ensuring the project’s key goals will be met. 

Training: More than 1,000 health workers received training on providing reproductive, maternal and child health services that are gender-sensitive. The health workers were also trained in best practices in sanitation and hygiene. Over 230 managers at health facilities received specialized training, which included supervision of staff, auditing of the facilities’ services and management of vital health data.

Public Meetings: Community events were organized to discuss how gender inequality and harmful traditional practices affect health, laying the groundwork for community-led change to improve the health of women and girls. Public meetings were also held to provide community-wide education on nutrition.

Community Voices

Midwifery student in Ethiopia

Mearem Dawud, midwifery student, Ethiopia

In the Afar region of Ethiopia, the project is supporting 16 young women to attend a three-year training program to become midwives. Mearem Dawud is one of the students.

Afar is a rural area with pastoralist (nomadic) communities. In these types of areas, well-trained midwives are essential for ensuring women have access to quality health care during pregnancy and delivery. 

“Afari girls are afraid of getting health services, because there is a lack of female health workers and because they are afraid of taking health services in the presence of males. Also, many girls have gone through Female Genital Mutilation [FGM, also known as Female Genital Cutting or FGC] and thus they become afraid of going for health services. So, I am hopeful that I can help girls by providing health services myself. I am also hopeful that I can help to change attitudes in my community on harmful traditional practices [such as FGM/C] by facilitating dialogue in my community.”

-- Mearem Dawud

Project At A Glance

Situation:
Rural and remote areas lack access to basic health care essential for mother and child survival

Action:
We are bringing together Canadian and African expertise to tackle key contributors to poor health, such as lack of access to family planning and other sexual and reproductive health services. 

Expected Results:
1.7 million women, children and men benefit directly through training, education or health services. 

Partners:

Christian Children’s Fund of Canada

Centre for Global Child Health at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto

WaterAid Canada

 

Kevin O'Neill
Director of Programs

Kevin O'NeillWant to partner with Amref Health Africa in Canada on a health project? Want to know more about our projects? Get in touch with our Director of Programs, Kevin O'Neill.